Netflix Chooses Blu-Ray... Exclusively. Yet Another Indication that HD-DVD is Dead


I've written about Blu-Ray's domination over HD-DVD and this latest development is even more telling. When I purchased my Sony PS3 for Blu-Ray movies, I immediately signed up with Netflix as I didn't own a single title. At the time, Netflix offered Blu-Ray and HD-DVD movies - but today, Netflix is announcing that they will only carry Blu-Ray movies going forward.

Stunning move. For a company with such rich user data and popular trends, Netflix must realize that HD-DVD is simply dying (or dead):

With the industry now having picked a winner in the face-off between the two competing high- definition DVD formats, Netflix, Inc. (NASDAQ: NFLX) , the world's largest online movie rental service, today said that it will move toward stocking high-def DVDs exclusively in the Blu-ray format.

Citing the decision by four of the six major movie studios to publish high-def DVD titles only in the Sony-developed Blu-ray format, Netflix said that as of now it will purchase only Blu-ray discs and will phase out by roughly year's end the alternative high-def format, HD DVD, developed by Toshiba.

Since the first high-definition DVDs came on the market in early 2006, Netflix has stocked both formats. But the company said that in recent months the industry has stated its clear preference for Blu-ray and that it now makes sense for the company to initiate the transition to a single format.

"The prolonged period of competition between two formats has prevented clear communication to the consumer regarding the richness of the high-def experience versus standard definition," said Ted Sarandos, chief content officer for Netflix. "We're now at the point where the industry can pursue the migration to a single format, bring clarity to the consumer and accelerate the adoption of high-def. Going forward, we expect that all of the studios will publish in the Blu-ray format and that the price points of high-def DVD players will come down significantly. These factors could well lead to another decade of disc-based movie watching as the consumer's preferred means."

More also at Silicon Alley Insider and Engadget